Outcomes in Healthcare Seeing Support and New Light

Outcomes in Healthcare Seeing Support and New Light

Outcomes in Healthcare No Comments

When trying to reach a goal, sometimes it is best to think of the end product and fix all the processes to then meet up with the expectation. In healthcare, it isn’t much different with the end goal being to have the best possible outcome and health for the patient. So, the steps involved in care need to be addressed so as to reach this goal and take care of the patient. Outcomes in healthcare need to be structured from the foundation on up, but these help to improve overall care and results.

Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net/Flare

Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net/Flare

At some point or another, all of us end up on the healthcare system. Sometimes it is simply making sure that you get into check-ups every so often, but there are other times where accidents happen or the body just gives you problems that require medical attention. Obviously, when you seek a physician’s care and guidance, you are hoping to get rid of or correct what is ailing you. Often times it is the knowledge that after all the treatments, medications or whatever is required to get better, that it will all be worth the struggles, but it can be difficult to go through pain and discomfort. The outcome isn’t always the end vision of just the medical staff, but also the patients.

To help the outcomes in healthcare to fit more with the positive expectations that most of us hold, there are some practices that manage care better and improve those odds:

  • Depend upon set standards and guidelines
  • Methodically and routinely document patient’s information and progress
  • Draw from shared clinical and outcome information
  • Utilize and disseminate analytics for better decision-making practices
Courtesy of Flickr.com/photos/armydre

Courtesy of Flickr.com/photos/armydre

It is easy to understand that when you do the same action you usually get the same result, but this can be a little trickier in healthcare due to the fact that each of us is just a little different, and the possibility of other outside factors working against someone working on making a full recovery is a significant possibility. This shouldn’t deter a medical professional, in fact, this helps to solidify that the above stated practices need to be a norm and not an afterthought. When everyone is doing the same, basically adhering to the same standards, anyone can walk into a situation and continue where the last physician left off. This way, performance and processes are seamless and makes less guesswork for everyone providing care.

One of the important factors when looking at the processes followed by the healthcare professionals is to follow through and see if the processes lead to more positive outcomes. Just because changes are made doesn’t mean that they are the right changes, nor the effectual ones. Relying upon other healthcare organization’s changes and also patient feedback can give you some of the best working ideas as well as understanding where the greatest changes should be made.

Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net/Hin255

Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net/Hin255

The idea that patients have a say in their care and outcomes is becoming more and more of a serious discussion, especially when considering that the patient is invested in the outcome of their care. Many physicians might be thinking at this point that they have engaged conversations and engaged patients, but sometimes that is more of a personal perception rather than the feeling from the patients themselves. Patients have suggested that they don’t always want to come into the doctor’s office for simple questions, and so patient portals have been created where they can leave simple messages or request prescription refills without having to break their routine or work schedule.

This same patient portal can also be used for the doctor to send information and suggestions for the patient so as to keep a patient motivated to get well or stay healthier. It has inspired some organizations and facilities to add and track wearable and mobile items in their practices. For instance, someone who has just been put on medication to lower their blood pressure can use an app to track their blood pressure every day. This app can then transfer the information to the doctor, who can then make more informed decisions and help personalize the care for that one patient without dedicating too much time in the office. The patient is also seeing the consequences of what is going on with their care and can thus be more involved in the outcome.

Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net/WatchArakun

Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net/WatchArakun

Improvement is the name of the game when talking about outcomes in healthcare. Obviously, there are so many areas that can be addressed, we could spend weeks bantering back and forth about what could and might work, but each organization is unique, each population that is being served is unique, and there is no cookie-cutter program that takes everything into consideration. Patients are the priority and outcomes that are positive are the expectation, and much of this is very plausible.